Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121129
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
's requesting $37 billion from the federal government. >> and a new un climate change report out says sea level could be prizing -- rising faster than thought. that is especially troubling for those of us living and working near the edge of the bay. and more on the flooding dangers that could be around the corner. >> at high tide this submerged staircase is an erie reminder of the inches separating dry land from water. in 2008 bay waters flooded streets and sidewalks like they did in twut. the united nationspfip level sea levels are rising faster than predicted. >> today's flood going to be tomorrow's high tides. and so we need to get ready for changes, a deeper bay. a bay with bigger waves and more7?s8$ frequent flooding. >> the bay conservation and development commission is in charge of making these maps showing areas in danger of flooding. but now, maybe sooner with models of the un report that now account for melting perma froth. >> san francisco water front will be the last parts of the bay shore to flood. regulators caution if walls aren't built along the bay area shore line, communities
. >>> government's plan to set off a nuclear bomb on the moon. >>> when it comes to gas prices expect to pay more. motorists on pace to spend a record sum, 483 billion dollars in the year 2012 that breaks down to more than a billion dollars a day. experts say hurricane sandy and an investigation into refinery practices impacted the spike. there's some good news. the energy department projects fuel prices are expected to average about $3 boy 44 next year. >> -- $3.44 next year. >>> a bill called major step toward in protecting your electronic privacy the measure would require sewer a warrant from a judge before accessing content -- -- critics say the bill will do little to keep law enforcement from combing through e-mails and other private electronic messages. >>> did you enjoy your dry commute this morning? >> it was more stable than yesterday. there's going to be rain later on today. >>> live doppler already picking up light showers into the north bay, highway 101 cloverdale, clear lake and dry creek road you've had the persistent light rain showers, more intermittent from napa, sonoma, highway
to say i'm not going to let the state hurt our city or the federal government. we've got to innovate our way out of this economic dole drum and we are doing so with inviting people here. those of you who take this word challenge, and really can really seriously bring that to fore with your best ideas, this is what i'm doing with all these technology companies. i'm not satisfied with just hosting a new company in the city, i want to know what they're doing, who's working there, where they're coming from, what they plan for the five or 10 years and how we can help them grow. as they're growing their jobs i want to know technologically how we can help. that's why i love going to accelerators, to find out what are the next five years that we're incubating so when it comes like what happened last week with dr. yam naka working at gladstone institute at mission bay becomes one of the newest nobel prize winners in medicine working with uc-san francisco and the pharmaceutical companies there, they're on the verge of discovering wonderful stem cell research that will cure a lot of cancers in our
bay detainees could be headed here to stay. a government report concludes it's not a bad idea. >> it could mean the beginning. the end for gu guantanamo bay. diane feinstein asked for a study four years ago and got the report this month. >> reporter: 166 detainees could be housed safely in american prisons, according to a federal report released today. senator feinstein concludes that president obama's controversial plan to move detainees to the u.s. could work. she says 373 people charged or convicted of terrorism are already held in u.s. facilities without security problems. and the reporticize the defense diameter -- the report says the defense department has room for more. >> guantanamo is a real stain on our country's image abroad. >> reporter: he's been to guantanamo and interviewed dozens of inmates. moving the detainees could make a difference. >> there'll be a lot more human rights groups and liberties groups pushing to have a trial or release, and i think it'll be stronger in america. and that could make the difference in finally these men will get a trial. >> i thin
will be the topic of discussion on capitol hill today. the government accountability office will again try to convince the u.s. by switching from bills to more durable corns makes more sense. this would be the first time the g l made the change--would not be the first time. dollar bills are considered to be easier and led to carry. >> 507 $9 million power of jackpot winning tickets were sold in missouri and arizona. they matched all six numbers. they have no information on the winter. the will of elsewhere in when it was sold at a news conference today. someone is now million dollars richer during an interview with fortune mayor explain " we literally are moving the company from blackberries to smart phones. one of the really important for ya hoo as strategy is mobile. that is why they are moving forward. >> we will take a quick break we will be back with more headlines. the time is 4:12. we have a lot of wet weather still to our north of that is headed our way we will be back with the timing in just a minute. >> we are back. 4:14 is the time. power is back on for mpg&e customers lost pow
him and three activists. syrian leaders meeting and hope to form a transitional government that could take over syria if they are successful in over throwing the president. >> new details about a hero in last year's shooting at a cement plant. the district attorney said a truck driver is credited with lunging after the gunman in an effort to save his co workers, but he was shot and killed. that gunman, hid from police inside of a crawl space at a home in sunnyvale. deputies saw him the next day. they shot him but he had already died of aself inflicted gun shot wound. >>> a man convicted in a school bus kidnapping case won't be free any time soon. the 61-year-old fred woods was denied parole. he will stay in jail. he is one of three convicted of kidnapping a bus full of children in the central valley in 1976. another man was paroled in june. he was released in mountain view. >> round one is behind us. what about round go? steve is watching the latest computer models, he is working over there in the weather center. he have the timetable for how the rain will affect your day. >> and a
handle 166 terror suspects currently being detained at guantanomo bay, cuba. the government's accountability offices analyzed the potential effects if the u.s. decided to shut down the bay. senator dianne feinstein of california head of the senate intelligence committee says u.s. prisons already hold 373 inmates convicted of terrorism and there haven't been any security problems in those cases. but others say that doesn't matter. >> to have them in essence living on the same soil and being -- it's just uncomfortable. i think it's unfair to america. >> closing the guantanomo bay prison would save the u.s. an estimated $114 million a year. >>> it is 5:51. lindsay lohan in a nightclub brawl. we'll have the latest. >> new details on the troubled star's latest arrest. >> and a new way to deal with misbehaving kids. the controversy over one school's isolation booth. >> and we are following some breaking news right now. this is a box truck, an accident chopper 5 is over right now. and we are sending a crew on the scene. we'll have more details when we come back. ,, look at you guys
safely house guantanomo bay prisoners. that word comes after a four- year study by the government accountability office. u.s. prisons already hold hundreds of inmates convicted of terrorism and according to for dianne feinstein, head of the senate intelligence committee, there haven't been any security problems with the inmates. closing the guantanomo bay prison would save the u.s. an estimated $114 million a year. >>> 6:51. some new jobless claims are down as the impact of superstorm sandy fades away. here now to chat about that and more, jason brooks with kcbs and cbsmoneywatch.com. good morning. >> reporter: some decent news on the economy out there. the labor department reporting that first time weekly claims fell 23,000 to 393,000 and for the first time in several weeks, superstorm sandy not distorting figures. now the overall trend is still distorted. the four-week average rose to 450,000. and another look at the economy, come from the commerce department its second look at 3rd quarter gross domestic product overall economic growth revising it higher to 2.7% from an earlier
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8